Haim to Release New Album “Something To Tell You” on July 7

Need more great music to look forward to? Good news! Indie rock trio Haim are set to release their much anticipated new album Something To Tell You on July 7. A follow up to 2013’s Days Are Gone, Haim promises to deliver a “modern, exciting and fearless” collection of tracks. You can check out the music video for “Right Now” below!

According to the band, this is just a teaser of what’s to come – the official first single will be released next week on May 3. What are your thoughts on “Right Now”? Share in the replies!

Posted by Kiel Hauck

Podcast: The Brilliance of Kendrick Lamar’s “DAMN.”

A new Kendrick Lamar album has officially arrived! Brock Benefiel joins Kiel Hauck to discuss DAMN. and how it fits within Kendrick Lamar’s discography. The duo discuss Kendrick’s growing legacy, the absence of a true rival, and the variety of sonic and thematic ground covered on the new album. They also share their favorite tracks from DAMN. and rank Kendrick’s full length albums. Listen in!

Subscribe to our podcast here.

What are your thoughts on DAMN.? Share in the replies!

Posted by Kiel Hauck

Paramore to Release New Album “After Laughter” on May 12

The time has finally come! Four years after the release of their hugely successful self-titled album, Paramore will drop their fifth full length release titled After Laughter on May 12. The long-anticipated album is preceded by their latest single, “Hard Times” – an 80’s inspired pop track with a chorus that will be stuck in your head for the rest of the week. You can watch Paramore’s video for “Hard Times” below.

The artwork for After Laughter has also been released. Take a look!

After Laughter seems sure to harness the melodic sensibilities that have launched Paramore into the pop stratosphere over the past decade. Having original drummer Zac Farro back in the fold alongside guitarist Taylor York and vocalist Hayley Williams certainly adds an element of excitement as well.

What are your thoughts on the new song? Share in the replies!

Posted by Kiel Hauck

New Carly Rae Jepsen Song: “Cut to the Feeling”

As we eagerly await a new album from Carly Rae Jepsen, a new song titled “Cut to the Feeling” has surfaced online. The track is featured in the animated film Ballerina and is pure pop bliss. Take a listen below:

Jepsen has kept herself busy since the release of Emotion in 2015, appearing in Grease: Live, releasing a b-sides album last year, and even appearing in a Target commercial with Lil Yachty. Here’s hoping more new music is on the horizon soon.

What are your thoughts on “Cut to the Feeling”? Share in the replies!

Posted by Kiel Hauck

Reflecting On: The Academy Is… – Santi

It’s been 10 years and I’m still not completely sure how to use the word “Santi” in a sentence. Employing an inside joke from your high school days as the title of your sophomore release and potential mainstream breakthrough is admittedly curious, but The Academy Is always seemed to have an affinity for doing things their own way.

Two years before Santi’s release, the Chicago rock act had their breakthrough on Fueled by Ramen with Almost Here – a scene classic that helped define an era of snide emo pop, even as the album itself remained a relatively underground gem. The ensuing years would see a cast of the band’s label mates rise to pop radio stardom (Fall Out Boy, Panic! at the Disco, Paramore, Gym Class Heroes) while The Academy Is seemingly remained a buzz band on the brink.

You can buy Santi on iTunes.

Enter Santi – an album that seemed primed for success. With a stellar debut under their belt, one of the most exciting young frontmen in music behind the mic, and the benefit of rising Fueled by Ramen stock in their pocket, The Academy Is tabbed the legendary Butch Walker to produce the record. The resulting effort remains the band’s most divisive album to date, but is arguably their best.

I still remember purchasing Santi on the day of its release at a Hasting’s book store in Enid, Oklahoma. As a huge fan of Almost Here and a firm believer that the band was destined for stardom, I was giddy to see the CD’s front and center placement when I walked into the store. I also remember those subsequent first listens as I tried to process what I was hearing. Despite spinning the album for weeks on end, I couldn’t decide if I actually liked it.

Everything about Santi (aside from its peculiar title) seemed primed for a breakthrough. The album’s cover, featuring the band’s name in flashy neon lights. The Pete Wentz cameo in the band’s video for first single “We’ve Got a Big Mess on Our Hands” (which was later referenced in a Fall Out Boy video). A prime slot on the summer’s premier Honda Civic Tour. William Beckett’s cocky swagger blossoming even further, placing ruminations on impending fame to tape: “It was a big bang and a bright white light from nowhere / It turned my coach class window to a first class seat on the evening news on NBC”.

Despite all of the signs, Santi never quite took off. True to the band’s free and unconventional tendencies, the album was a complete departure from their debut. Gone were the pop punk leanings and snappy production of Almost Here, replaced by gritty guitars and stark changes of pace that gave Santi a garage or indie rock type feel. As the scene around the band began embracing the successful sheen of pop radio, Santi may have been ahead of its time, simply by avoiding an obvious approach.

If you were to dare administer criticism in the direction of Almost Here, you might draw attention to its lack of variety. That debut, for all of its worthy praise, avoided diversity at all costs, choosing to play to one very commendable strength. Santi, on the other hand, is so full of range that it’s hard to pin the album down to one particular genre.

While rich melody is present throughout, its presentation changes from track to track. Here you’ll find homages to classic rock (“Bulls in Brooklyn”), dance-y post-punk (“Same Blood”), mid-90s alt rock (“You Might Have Noticed”) and even a gentle ballad (“Everything We Had”). A signature Butch Walker underbelly of raw guitars serves as Santi’s refrain, even as the songs themselves vary wildly.

It is my firm belief that there is not a bad song on Santi. In fact, many of the album’s tracks would quietly prove to be the best work The Academy Is produced during their eight year run. Unfortunately, a lack of cohesiveness accompanied by a hard right turn from the sound that put the band on the map made Santi a tough pill to swallow for most fans, even though most seemed to have softened on the record over the course of the past decade.

The Academy Is released three very different albums during their short existence, each showcasing the kind of range that many bands could only dream of. In the case of The Academy Is, this penchant for variety potentially hamstrung the band from cashing in on a definitive sound that could have propelled them to greater heights. Instead, they remain mysterious legends, respected for their refusal to follow the crowd. If I had to make a guess, the band would likely say that they wouldn’t have had it any other way.

Honestly, I don’t think I would either. On a warm, sunny summer day, Almost Here can be found in regular rotation on my stereo – the perfect background music for the season. But when I want to remember how great of a band The Academy Is truly was and ponder on what could have been, I reach for Santi.

by Kiel Hauck

kiel_hauckKiel Hauck is the editor in chief at It’s All Dead. Over the past decade, he has been a contributor for multiple online and print publications and was most recently an editor at PopMatters. Kiel currently resides in Indianapolis, IN with his wife and their imaginary pet, Hand Dog. You can follow him on Twitter.

Kendrick Lamar Drops “The Heart Part 4”

And just like that, Kendrick Lamar has returned. Not even a week after Drake took over the headlines with his More Life playlist, Kendrick has dropped a new single titled “The Heart Part 4” in preparation for the release of his new album. The final lines of the track hint that the album will arrive on April 7.

There’s no disputing Kendrick’s current hold on the hip hop crown. 2015’s To Pimp a Butterfly was an immediate classic – an album that not only elevated Lamar as an artist, but also served as poignant and necessary commentary on race and social injustice in America. “The Heart Part 4” gives us reason to believe that Kendrick’s new body of work will continue the conversation.

There’s a lot to unpack in the nearly five minutes of music that feature no chorus, but one consistent stream of through. Perhaps the most discussed moments on the new track relate to perceived slights against Drake and Big Sean. Whether further barbs lie within the new album remains to be seen.

No matter what April 7 brings, we can rest assured that it will provide plenty to talk about and hopefully another full length album to dig into. Kendrick’s last two releases, To Pimp and good kid, m.A.A.d city, sound just as fresh as they did on the day of their respective releases. It could be a long two weeks, but I have confidence that it will be worth the wait.

by Kiel Hauck

kiel_hauckKiel Hauck is the editor in chief at It’s All Dead. Over the past decade, he has been a contributor for multiple online and print publications and was most recently an editor at PopMatters. Kiel currently resides in Indianapolis, IN with his wife and their imaginary pet, Hand Dog. You can follow him on Twitter.

Drake Returns with “More Life” Playlist

As winter begins to thaw and give way to spring, there’s one thing you can count on. No, not seasonal allergies – new music from Drake.

The Toronto rapper has been making a habit of dropping surprise projects on us this time of year. In 2015, it was the out-of-nowhere mixtape If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late. Last year, Views arrived as one of the biggest releases of 2016. This past weekend brought More Life – a new playlist.

It’s fairly clear that Drake is a man who rarely sleeps. These surprise releases never seem to be short collections, but are instead consistently large bodies of work that take more than a few days to digest, making reaction in the moment nearly impossible. Perhaps that’s the point.

In 2015, If You’re Reading This became a hot topic not just because of its unexpected nature, but because of the immediate conversation of what qualifies as a mixtape in the digital age. Last year, Views, released as an official full length album, immediately became the hottest selling release of the year, despite lukewarm reviews that trickled in as the weeks passed.

This time around, we’re left asking what this playlist even means. According to Drake himself, More Life is intended to serve as a “collection of songs that become the soundtrack to your life.” True to form, it doesn’t quite feel cohesive in a way you’d expect an official release to flow and will likely avoid review in the typical form. It will not, however, avoid weeks of discussion.

This buzz-generating method of releasing new music has become signature Drake, and perhaps further amplifies voices that declare traditional albums to be irrelevant. In fact, Drake has become a central point in the pop culture zeitgeist and pop music discussion without ever releasing what could be qualified as a “classic” album (we can argue about Take Care another time). As long as tracks like “Hotline Bling” and “One Dance” continue to intermittently dominate airwaves and meme generators, he really doesn’t even need one.

I like Drake. I usually enjoy 6-7 songs on these 20-track behemoths that now come as often as Christmas. I’ll probably spend the next few weeks streaming More Life and deciding which songs will make repeat appearances in my Spotify queue. What I can’t do is offer much more than a shrug and a few head nods to the conversation about Drake as anything more than background noise amidst the current boon of powerful and impactful hip hop voices.

And that’s fine. We need sounds to prepare us for summer. If Drake wants to be our annual reminder to create a “new music” playlist, I’m happy to pass the time while waiting for Kendrick’s new album to arrive.

by Kiel Hauck

kiel_hauckKiel Hauck is the editor in chief at It’s All Dead. Over the past decade, he has been a contributor for multiple online and print publications and was most recently an editor at PopMatters. Kiel currently resides in Indianapolis, IN with his wife and their imaginary pet, Hand Dog. You can follow him on Twitter.

Podcast: Interview with Garron DuPree of Eisley

It’s been one month since indie pop outfit Eisley released I’m Only Dreaming, their fifth full-length album, and now the band is back out on the road. During a recent tour stop in Indianapolis, Eisley bassist Garron DuPree talked with Kiel Hauck about how recent lineup changes impacted the band’s writing process and how he views Eisley’s evolution. Garron also shares the excitement the band felt while working with producer Will Yip and how the band’s new form provides more freedom than ever before. Listen in!

Subscribe to our podcast here.

*This podcast mistakenly refers to Garron as Sherri’s brother. Garron is Sherri’s cousin.

What is your favorite song from Eisley’s new album, I’m Only Dreaming? Share your thoughts in the replies!

Posted by Kiel Hauck

Reviving the Future: An Interview with Ryan Fergus of Lucky Boys Confusion

Last week, Lucky Boys Confusion released their first new single in nearly a decade. “It’s After Midnight” is an aggressive rock song that finds a slick balance of crunching harmonies balanced against a swirling story of a relationship spiraling out of control.

As a long-time fan of Lucky Boys Confusion, the song is a refreshing answer to the curiosity of what a band that hasn’t written a full record for almost 15 years looks to create, and how it balances against the rest of their career. For a smaller band, Lucky Boys Confusion has an exceptionally strong and loyal fan base that follows them from show to show, and “It’s After Midnight” certainly beckons their attention.

With just a month until the release of new album Stormchasers, I spoke with drummer Ryan Fergus about the build up leading to its creation and what it means for the future.

***

First off, “It’s After Midnight” is awesome. I’ve been listening to it since it was released and it really feels organic for the band. Do you think it reflects how the album sounds stylistically, or does it branch and venture out more?

Oh thanks! Yeah, we’re really excited about it and it’s been getting a lot of really great feedback. You know, when you go away for as long as we did, and we really created this record in a vacuum, you get a little bit nervous. We really love this, we’re really jacked about this but we don’t know how people are going to receive it. It was such a relief to finally get at least one song out there to kind of show people what we’ve been working on, and the reception has been really positive, which is really encouraging for the rest of the record.

To answer your question, it would definitely be a song that we thought would kind of bridge the gap, so to speak, in terms that it does sound reminiscent of a lot of songs off of Commitment or Throwing the Game. It’s really reminiscent of the How to Get Out Alive EP, but it is a bridge. There are a lot of songs on the record that sound like the older stuff, but there is some modernization and maturity to it and we’re trying different things.

It’s probably our most cohesive record. It’s very fortuitous that we’re talking today, as we just got the final master of the whole record back today. To hear everything together as one rolling, cohesive piece, I’m just on cloud nine right now. We’re really pumped up about it.

That’s fantastic! I was going to say, the single reminds me of How to Get Out Alive. It’s interesting that it’s more cohesive. Closing Arguments, I know it was a mix of demos and B-sides, but it did feel like a patchwork of songs.

Yeah, it wasn’t as coherent. It was basically seeds of what would have been the next record, and obviously that would have changed a lot. And we had a chance to start fresh. We didn’t revisit any of those old pieces so this is all new ideas and arrangements. All new ideas we really cooked up in the last year, year and a half. Once we started working on it and decided that we could do this, it all came together very quickly. It does feel like one piece. There’s no little skips, there’s no 30-second interludes – it’s 12 songs, and it’s a story.

Really, it’s closure in a lot of ways. That’s not to imply that this is the last thing we’re ever going to do, because if anything, we’re more invigorated than ever. What I mean by that is everything that happened to us over the last four of five years, we didn’t really comment publicly on it. Most notably, our guitarist, Joe Sell died suddenly, tragically and very young. I think we left a lot of people in a lurch. We didn’t really have a way of addressing everything we’ve been through in the last few years.

This is kind of our statement to everything that has gone down and what we’ve been through, and there were some pretty dark times, I won’t lie. But I think this has been really therapeutic for us, and we’re all in a really good place. And we’re excited to be working together. We really couldn’t be more pleased with how everything came out.

Everyone has been kind of focused on their side projects for quite some time. Was it natural to be writing together again? Especially since Stubhy (Pandav) and Adam (Krier) went their own way for a while and wrote in their own ways for so long, did things mesh well when everyone came together again?

Yeah, it felt like home, I think, a lot for all of us. Especially for the two of them from a song writing perspective. What happened after Joe passed, it kind of spun us all out in different directions. For Jason (Schultejann) and Adam, they started AM Taxi. Stubhy had multiple projects that he was involved in. My project was kind of having a normal life. Having a job, getting married, having two great kids and living a more normal day-to-day. To do that and then come back into this, and bring a lot of lessons learned with maturity, the things we’ve gone through and bring those together… It was comforting.

The joke of it is, the creative part of this thing has been the easy part. The songs really came together quick, we didn’t have a lot of knock-down, drag-out arguments about arrangements. Even the recording process was a really smooth situation. Honestly, the difficult part for us has been everything else.

We’re doing this completely self-sufficient. There’s no label, there’s no manager, nobody. If anything, the difficult aspect of setting this up and launching it is that we’re doing everything on our own. Every day is a thousand tiny decisions with a constant text thread between the four of us during all hours of the night, starting at 7:30 in the morning. It’s just an ongoing dialogue for a year of, “Hey, did you call that guy?” or “Johnny K (producer) needs an answer today for the mix.” The difficult part has just been the little technical aspects. The creative part was actually quite wonderful and really did feel like coming home again.

Listening to “It’s After Midnight”, the lyrics are about a pained relationship, and they’re fairly vindictive. Lucky Boys have been known for a slight storytelling aspect as much as you are for party songs. With everything that has happened, is Stormchasers more of a serious record, then?

It’s not a kind record, but that doesn’t mean it’s not fun. If anything, it’s a celebration record. It’s celebrating life, death, love, losing love. All the aspects that kind of make up the human condition. There are darker aspects and you can make the claim that the world is going in a darker direction than it was five or 10 years ago. It’s definitely a reflection, and I think people will see a lot of things they identify with on the record.

There’s a lot of stuff about Stubhy’s marriage, which he’s been very open about and I’m proud of him that it’s out there. But his marriage ended. He’s since fallen in love again, engaged and getting married this summer so it’s been this roller coaster in a lot of ways. He’s been very transparent about that. There are a lot of lines on the record, where you just go, “Wow, he went there.” And I’m so proud of him for not holding that back and not pulling punches.

In that regard, I think people will be surprised at the lengths we’ve gone with some of this stuff and ultimately, it’s a lot of things people will identify with. We got older, but a lot of the folks that are listening to us have been along for the ride and gotten older too. They’ve got responsibilities, they’ve got relationships they’re maintaining and dealing with, someone in their family that have been through some pretty tough times as well. It’s stuff people can relate to, tear apart and identify with.

Speaking of the fan base, I just moved to Chicago a few years ago, and everyone I’ve met who has any kind of interest in rock music knows who Lucky Boys Confusion are. A lot of them seem to have the same type of story, where it’s almost an urban legend where someone finds a copy of Throwing the Game tucked away in a closet somewhere and just falls in love with it after listening to it. That’s one of the things I’ve noticed being at live shows, it’s a lot of the same people coming again and again, talking about past shows. Do you pick up on that from the fan base in general?

It’s stunning to me. It’s stunning to all of us. I’m not sure that you know this, but this year is actually our 20 year anniversary. We started this band when we were 18 years old and just out of high school, and there are a lot of people who have been there since year one or year two. It’s unbelievable. We’re starting to get to the point where some of these folks are starting to bring their kids. Their kids are old enough to go to shows now. It’s definitely a surreal thing.

But you’re right, there are so many stories about, “my older brother left the CD with me before he went to college and then I got into you guys.” It’s really been amazing, and what we’ve kind of said all along is that if they keep coming, then we’re going to keep showing up.

Especially for this long stretch here where we weren’t putting out any new content and you start to think, it’s gotta be here, right? You’re gonna start to see a drop off, kids are going to stop coming and we’re kind of back where we started, playing for 30 people. But so far, that hasn’t happened.

That was definitely in the back of our minds, but these folks have been coming out to hear the same older songs for however long now and we owe them something new. I’d be lying if I didn’t say that we wanted to come out with something new, especially for the folks that have been around for so long and have been patient and just waiting. We thought maybe there never would be a record. We’re excited to make that happen for the diehards throughout the many years and we’re just so appreciative of that.

I know it’s a hack question, but do you have a favorite song off of the new record?

[sigh] No, it’s a great question. [laughs]

No, it’s probably changing by the day. Again, it’s a record that finally feels like a whole thing. But we’ve got a song called “Sun In My Eyes” that’s probably going to be our next single. That’s going to come out this month, actually when the preorder goes up on iTunes and whatnot. But I think it’s going to throw some people for a curve ball. It’s a bit more different than anything we’re really tried. “It’s After Midnight” is a call to arms and the announcement that we’re back and Lucky Boys are grown up. “Sun In My Eyes”, I think is something totally different. It’s poppy, kind of a mystical tune but it really crunches, it really rocks. It still feels like us, and I’m really digging that right now.

We close the record with a tune called “Candle in the Window” and it’s the same thing, it’s really different. It sound kind of like an old Elvis Costello B-side or something. It’s really powerful and kind of punctuates the record. And there are a lot of different fields and different directions. Listening to it today as a cohesive piece, it really feels like one statement. I’m really excited to get it out there.

Lastly, what do you think Stormchasers means for the future of Lucky Boys Confusion, especially after you said everyone seems more invigorated now than they have been for a while?

You know, its funny. I like serial dramas on Hulu, like “The Americans” and shows like that, and a lot of these shows are in a bubble. They don’t always know if they’re going to be renewed, so what they do is have this year end finale that wraps up the current storyline and resolves those problems, but it leaves the door open for more story. I think it’s an analog to Stormchasers in that, if it ends up being the last record, I think it’s turning the last pages of the book.

But it’s not a full resolve. Don’t get me wrong, a lot of time, a lot of hard work, a lot of intense moments here and there, but overall this was a really pleasant, really great experience. A lot of that was based on working with our producer, Johnny K, who is just amazing. He produced it, engineered it, mixed it so that this became one single vision.

I would feel very open, and I think the way the guys are feeling right now, that they would probably agree that there’s no reason that this couldn’t be the beginning of a really nice creative era for us. This year is really about the new record, and celebrating the 20 year anniversary. We really want to mark that and will probably be doing some stuff later in the year to mark that. It’s kind of a big deal – not many bands get to 20 years.

But there’s nothing saying that there couldn’t be more in the future, especially with as excited as everybody is right now. It’s definitely viable.

by Kyle Schultz

kyle_catKyle Schultz is the Senior Editor at It’s All Dead and has worked as a gaming journalist at Structure Gaming. He lives in Chicago and has been to a Lucky Boys Confusion show at least once every year for a decade. Their shows have never once gotten stale in that time. It really was an honor to talk to someone who has kept the attention of myself and my nonsense friends for that long. My apartment suddenly smells like spray paint, and that can’t be great.

The Maine Release New Song “Black Butterflies & Déjà Vu”

c-the-maine-asia-tour-2017

Is it possible to call The Maine underrated? The Tempe, Arizona, pop rock act has aggressively progressed their sound over the past 10 years, steadily evolving their fan base in the progress. Now, just a month away from their latest release, Lovely, Little, Lonely, the band has released a delicious new track titled “black butterflies & déjà vu”. Take a listen to the song below:

Fast-paced guitars accompany John O’Callaghan’s fierce delivery and prove once again that The Maine aren’t afraid to take chances. 2015’s American Candy found the band blending glossy pop rock with aggressive guitars and melody, while Lovely, Little, Lonely appears to be adding 80s elements to the mix as well.

It’s hard not to marvel at The Maine for taking the reigns after their major label fallout in 2011 and pushing ahead with the best music of their careers. Despite multiple hurdles, the band has refused to follow obvious trends and continue to be pop rock tastemakers in their own right.

You can pre-order the new album here.

What are your thoughts on the two new tracks from Lovely, Little, Lonely? Share in the replies!

Posted by Kiel Hauck