A Half-Assed Theory on Discovering New Music

Over the last several years, I have been been improving myself mentally. I heard new music but wasn’t listening. Now in a better place, I am revisiting some albums with fresh eyes to see what it means to me now. Cheers.

Finding new music is easy, but loving new music is a chore. When I think of the bands I love the most, it’s because I discovered them during a transition in my life. Going to high school (New Found Glory), first girlfriend (Saves the Day), college and first apartment (Panic! at the Disco, Lucky Boys Confusion), and discovering the real world (The Wonder Years), led to me listening to this music nonstop for decades, as well as other bands that cropped up in the same eras.

However, stagnation and depression hamper the joy in personal growth. In retrospect, it seems obvious that such memorable moments imprint themselves in the music we listen to. But seeing it in action in real time is a special moment everyone should experience. Thus, I have developed a theory!

I recently started a new day job, which is the biggest change to my life in years. It required spending two weeks in Wisconsin by myself for training. I tried to prep music for the trip, but felt bored looking over my usual soundtracks. Instead, I prepped a bunch of music I’ve reviewed for It’s All Dead in years past or bought for my collection and then (for no reason at all) never listened to again: Neck Deep, State Champs, We Are the In Crowd, Superet, Honeyblood, and many more.

There are many ways to connect to music, whether that be a connection with the lyrics or the music filling your veins with energy. Oftentimes, music means so much to us because of the nostalgia and memories we associate with it. My theory on falling in love with music is obvious, but is proposed as such: the most direct appreciation to new music is during a new life experience.

The first nerve-wracking day of my job, I played Neck Deep’s Life’s Not Out to Get You twice throughout the day, as it seemed appropriate for someone who waits for the worst to happen and then adjusts accordingly. Checking into my hotel, “Threat Level Midnight” played as I walked through the halls. As vocalist Ben Barlow sang, “I’ll see your face down here real soon / A welcome home to a swift farewell”, I opened my door and found another family staying in my room. Dirty clothes, pool toys, suitcases and children’s toys were spread across the room, so I panicked and quickly shut the door.

The hotel told me that there was a family refusing to leave and squatting in the room; they had torn the phone from the wall and refused to respond to maintenance knocking on the door as “Can’t Kick Up the Roots” rang through one ear bud (“Yeah this place is a shipwreck / But this shipwreck, it is mine”). Although a misunderstanding all around, it took an hour to get me a room and Neck Deep kept me company at the counter during frenzied calls and panicked looks from the staff in my direction after being told, “Everything is under control.” Ironically, Neck Deep was also playing when the keys to my room didn’t work the second week and the entire staff recognized me as I told them I was locked out (“All eyes on me, but that’s not reality /… claustrophobic in my own skin / From holding it all in” – “The Grand Delusion”; The Peace and the Panic).

There is a massive public pathway that traces the lake in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. My first night there, I found myself alone in the dark, walking a treacherous path with only the moon lighting the lake to my side as I hurried back to the hotel with Superet jamming away in my head (“And when the lights go out / Will you be having fun alone? / I need revolution / It’s you, only you” – “Bone Bag”; How To Work a Room).

I discovered smoking in bars is still acceptable in Wisconsin, as I stepped into a pub and saw 20 locals starring at me with suspicion with We Are The In Crowd blasting away through my phone (“I guess it was wishful to think / I was different from the rest / Now I’m red in the face / I don’t think I’m impressed” – “Better Luck Next Time”; Best Intentions). I fell asleep to State Champs playing quietly, vividly aware that I didn’t have to worry as much about money for a while (“Wash away all the thoughts that come at you like monsters at night / I don’t wanna live this way / Strong enough to break these chains / Broken pieces can mend…This is our time, our time to go” – “Our Time To Go”; Living Proof).

This massive life event has spawned moment after moment that I will never forget, each accompanied by bands I should have been in love with years ago. I can blame depression for hampering my ability to connect to the music before now, but the truth is I should have been listening regardless. The fact that I felt a connection to so many bands the last couple of weeks means I should have enjoyed them before now. Using a life event to listen to them finally feels like a crutch, and I wish I had spent more time loving them on my own. However, I will never forget these bands or the memories I made listening to them during these two weeks that changed my life.

by Kyle Schultz

kyle_catKyle Schultz is the Senior Editor at It’s All Dead and has worked as a gaming journalist at Structure Gaming. He lives in Chicago and just watched a framed picture fall off the wall of his hotel room for no particular reason while writing this. He blames earthquakes for it so that he doesn’t have to think about ghosts before bed. What a fool!

Advertisements

Neck Deep Take “The Peace and the Panic” on the Road

Neck Deep have been on my concert bucket list for a while now and I finally got to check them off. They’re one of my favorite bands, and every time they’ve come to my area, I’ve been busy. So when they took The Peace and the Panic tour to The Palladium in Worcester, Massachusetts, I got tickets as soon as I could. I wasn’t missing out this time. So far, this is the best show of 2018. (It’s only the second I’ve gone to so far, but let’s forget about that for a little while, guys.)

The show opened up with Creeper, and like Neck Deep, they’re from the U.K. I listened to them a little bit on the way to the show and I liked the fact that the lead vocalist’s voice was so unique. A lot of times, I feel like punk music can be a bit sonically redundant, but the lead singer has such an original vocal style that I can’t mistake a Creeper song for a song by any other artist. I experienced my first circle pit during their set, so that was mildly frightening, but interesting, nevertheless. A fun fact I learned about this band is that they’re on Roadrunner Records, the same label that used to host the meme-famous Nickelback.

Creeper

Next of the four bands was Speak Low If You Speak Love, who were the self-professed “mellow” band on the tour, but they still held their own. They were also the only band from the U.S. on the tour. Unfortunately, I spent most of the show in the merch line, but I actually thought it gave me a better idea of what the band sounded like live. A lot of times I’m focused on being close to the stage, which definitely muddies the sound, and it was kind of nice to have a fully cohesive idea of each band’s style. They released a new album a couple of weeks back called Nearsighted. They played a seven song set, four being from the new album. I’d strongly suggest everyone check it out, as I love the sound of it.

Speak Low

Finally out from the endless merch line, I slipped back into the crowd for Seaway. They’re from Canada, which anyone could guess from the fact that they have a song called “Keep Your Stick on the Ice”. Seaway continued the opening excellence with a fantastic set, proving once again: Always get to the show early, kids. You never know where your new favorite band is hiding. The band’s energy was great, they sang a lot of (what seemed to me) classics from their discography, and really enjoyed their time on stage. I love to see that authenticity from a band, it really helps me get into it regardless of whether I know the band or not.

Finally, after waiting for a long time, Neck Deep got on stage. For their set-up, they covered the stage in a huge white sheet, to provide an air of mystery, I suppose. They played what could only be called an explosive set. It was totally worth the wait to see them in an indoor venue, rather than at Warped or another festival like that. It’s more personal and there are less distractions.

Neck Deep

They opened with “Happy Judgement Day” from their latest album, then proceeded to play a well balanced mix of their new and old stuff. They also played “December” from their 2015 release, Life’s Not Out to Get You with the full band, rather than the original acoustic recording. They released the full band version on a deluxe version of that album, but I was surprised that they played it that way. I figured it would be the start of the inevitable acoustic part of most of these shows. They ended up playing “Head to the Ground” acoustically, a song with a chaotic and angry original recording. I thought it was a cool twist.

Something I really liked about The Peace and the Panic is how mature it is from a lyrical standpoint. Both Ben Barlow (lead vocals) and Fil Thorpe-Evans (bassist) sang “Wish You Were Here” and you could’ve heard a pin drop. The moment felt so genuine, the crowd waved lighters in the air instead of cell phones. The band took the opportunity to talk about mental health and how their hope as a band is to help people see the value in their lives. It was a really wonderful time and something that’s much needed in the alt scene.

They played a two song encore and ended the show with “Where Do We Go When We Go”, which was honestly the perfect song to end such a great show with. It was high energy and the final track on the album, so it tied everything together nicely. It was a great night and I hope I’ll get the opportunity to see them live again.

by Nadia Paiva

kiel_hauckNadia Paiva has been a music enthusiast since she can remember. Going to shows is her main pastime. The other is being upset when she can’t go to shows. This is her first official venture into writing about music. You can follow her on Twitter.

Review: Neck Deep – The Peace and the Panic

In the last few years, Neck deep have grown exponentially. When I listened to their first album, I remember thinking about how I was aware that they were a band starting their career. Only within the last year have I heard their sophomore effort, Life’s Not Out to Get You, which was a sizeable leap forward in song writing skill and kept my attention for quite some time. The Peace and the Panic, the third album from the band, is not only their best work to date, it is a near perfect blend of the best aspects of pop punk with a personalized edge to it.

You can buy The Peace and the Panic on iTunes.

Neck Deep have found their groove in the scene, with a perfected mix of New Found Glory’s pop and memorable lyrics and the harsh guitars of A Day To Remember and Four Year Strong. There is an argument that the tracks might be over-produced (depending on your preference), but there is a satisfying edge to the tempered guitars.

This is a band who is unapologetically pop punk, but carving their own path through what could be an otherwise stagnated genre. “Don’t Wait” is a heavy pop song that wouldn’t have felt genuine on an earlier album as it delves into questioning the government and gaining enough perspective on the world to create your own decisions. “19 Seventy Sumthin’” is sonically caught somewhere between The Early November’s “Driving South” and Polar Bear Club’s “Drifting Thing”. It’s a beautiful mixture that shows the talent behind the band and how far they have come.

Guitarists Matt West and newcomer Sam Bowden seem to relish in the simplicity of pop punk power chords while still finding the harder edge that has been missing on the band’s last two releases (“Motion Sickness”, “Heavy Lies”) while also striking a crisp power pop melody throughout (“The Grand Delusion”). Bassist Fil Thorpe-Evans provides a heavy spine to keep the songs propped up with bucking lines (“Parachute”). Drummer Dani Washington is at his best, finding a solid mix of beats ranging from hard punk (“Motion Sickness”) to 90’s alternative (“Parachute”).

Vocalist Ben Barlow showcases his best performance yet. He is experienced enough to test his range and write some incredibly catchy and memorable hooks. The directions he takes songs into are notable as well, as they delve deeper than any of their other records. The confidence of youth is on full display, such as in “Parachutes” as he sings, “I’m done with small town politics / I need to make my way to where the action is / I’m done with it, so the question is / are you coming with?”

Lead single, “In Bloom” is a reverberating pop jam, reminiscent of Brian Fallon’s swirling guitars as Barlow asks for a chance to recover from his own sadness to help pick up the pieces of a broken relationship. “Don’t Wait” begs the listener to look further for the truth in government and politics, with a backing threat of Sam Carter screaming behind the chorus. “Disrupted they keep dividing / the government is lying / I’m not going to be a pharisee of this society / Turn off your TV station, that’s not real information”.

Perhaps most satisfying is “19 Seventy Sumthin’”. The song traces the story of Barlow’s parents from the beginnings of their relationship through his father’s death. The song is light and cheery, as a happy marriage should be, before delving into heavier guitars during the eulogy of his father. “We made it here my dear, grandkids and the mortgage paid off / Is this what dreams are made of, cuz baby we made it / Yeah, baby, you saved me / But nothing could save him from the ambulance that day”.

The Peace and the Panic is an album about finding the best in life, even if the path there is littered with road blocks. This is best expressed through closing track “Where Do We Go When We Go”, as Barlow sings, “Pain, pain, go away. Come back another day / I just wanna get one up on life before it kills me”.

Neck Deep have cemented themselves as a cornerstone of modern pop punk with this album. They haven’t redefined pop punk, because they haven’t had to. Instead, they have found the lifeblood of the genre and pumped it alive again like all great punk albums do – with ferociously uplifting music, lyrics hoping for the best despite the odds, and a guarantee that you’ll be singing along on the second listen.

4.5/5

by Kyle Schultz

kyle_catKyle Schultz is the Senior Editor at It’s All Dead and has worked as a gaming journalist at Structure Gaming. He lives in Chicago and is just the worst. He stepped on a pile of tomatoes yesterday. Who does that? Who doesn’t notice a hillock of tomatoes on the sidewalk and at least make an attempt to dodge? This idiot, that’s who. Boo him to his face.