What to Make of Underoath’s Rebirth

underoath-2015

Nothing lasts forever – not even the inevitable break up of your favorite band. Recent years have seen an avalanche of reunion tours and comebacks, the most recent of which belongs Tampa, Florida, post-hardcore pioneers, Underoath. Not even three years since the announcement of their disbandment, Underoath will be hitting the road next spring for a full U.S. tour, with possibly much more to come.

If we’ve learned anything over the past few years, it’s that there’s clearly a market for such revivals. Fall Out Boy is bigger than ever since ending their hiatus in 2013, and bands like Sleater-Kinney, Saosin, Acceptance, Alexisonfire and many more are reaping the benefits of a return.

With the emergence of anniversary tours and accompanying commemorate merch, there are seemingly more reasons than ever to “get the band back together,” and Underoath appeared to be a prime candidate at some point. But for a band that so emphatically shut the door on their future, for a variety of completely rational reasons, does their sudden reemergence seem suspect?

The most common response to these sorts of announcements is to quickly cry, “Cash grab!” into the black hole of online comment threads. However, this sort of response negates years of history, hard work, natural ability and life experiences that members pour into their bands. Underoath were no strangers to inner turbulence, but their enduring friendships and commitment to their craft has been well documented.

There is no argument to be made that Underoath caught lightning in a bottle with any specific release and seeks to relive a moment of glory. The band’s final four albums stand as examples of post-hardcore excellence that today’s newer acts still aspire to. Underoath was more than any one album – each individual member’s talent and vision drove forward a whirlwind of clashing philosophies and sonic interests that challenged the boundaries of genre and kept listeners on their toes.

The most common reasons given for the band’s break up revolved around ideas of family and stability. After over 15 years on the road and in the studio, Underoath was spent, although not everyone in the band was in agreement about what that should mean. What is now clear is that a future was never off the table, even if the band’s wording upon their break was poorly chosen. That the return features the long-standing lineup of Tim McTague, James Smith, Grant Brandell, Chris Dudley, Spencer Chamberlain and Aaron Gillespie speaks volumes. It truly couldn’t be any other way.

The 32-city Rebirth Tour will find the band playing their breakout album They’re Only Chasing Safety and their landmark follow-up Define the Great line in their entirety every night. Fans that complain about the absence of 2008’s Lost in the Sound of Separation or 2010’s Ø (Disambiguation) on this trek miss out on the obvious joy of this occasion and will likely find themselves in attendance anyway. This isn’t an encore – it’s a new beginning.

Will the band’s collective re-charged batteries result in more than just a tour? Does Underoath have another groundbreaking album in them? It’s certainly not unthinkable. No matter what comes out of this rebirth, the mere idea of it happening this soon is exciting enough. Underoath consistently pushed their peers to think harder about their music and their purpose – and we all benefited from it. It’s not hard to imagine their presence having that impact once again.

In an interview with Alternative Press, Gillespie stated that Underoath means “something separately to each one of us and I think it’s something separate to every single person who bought those records.” The band’s reach extends far, making this reunion a thrilling one for all kinds of fans. But this reunion also means something to the members involved. Underoath stands to make a profit from their rebirth, but the bottom line has never been the driving force. Whatever it is that has made this return a reality is fairly unimportant. It’s here – let’s enjoy the ride.

by Kiel Hauck

kiel_hauckKiel Hauck is the editor in chief at It’s All Dead. Over the past decade, he has been a contributor for multiple online and print publications and was most recently an editor at PopMatters. Kiel currently resides in Indianapolis, IN with his wife and their imaginary pet, Hand Dog. You can follow him on Twitter.

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